Haeckel Mandala

Haeckel Mandala, digital collage, open edition print, Paula Brett

Ernst Heinrich Philipp August Haeckel (German: [ˈhɛkəl]; 16 February 1834 – 9 August 1919[1]) was a German biologist, naturalist, philosopher, physician, professor, and artist who discovered, described and named thousands of new species, mapped a genealogical tree relating all life forms, and coined many terms in biology, including anthropogeny, ecology, phylum, phylogeny, stem cell, and Protista. Haeckel promoted and popularised Charles Darwin’s work in Germany and developed the influential but no longer widely held recapitulation theory (“ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny”) claiming that an individual organism’s biological development, or ontogeny, parallels and summarises its species’ evolutionary development, or phylogeny. (Wikipedia)

The images I chose to use from Haeckel’s work are all rights free and in the public domain.

About the Mandala Series:

“Mandala is a Sanskrit word:  manda= essence, la=within; it is a circle that contains the essence. The mandala symbolizes the laws of the universe and, since man is a microcosm of the universe, many cultures believe that the mandala also symbolizes the human soul.”

I’ve been drawn to Mandalas ever since I witnessed a group of Tibetan Buddhist Monks making a traditional sand mandala on the ground. The idea of creating such a beautiful work of art and then destroying it in order to symbolize the transitory nature of life intrigued me. Because of that formative experience, I’ve made mandalas intermittently over the years in different forms. Only recently have I delved into the mandalas fully as a way to meld my love for design, spirituality, and the need to create some sort of order and meaning out of so much chaos in the world. In this most recent series of mandala photographs, my intention is to arrange ordinary objects in a pattern that becomes sacred, where the everyday turns divine, the enticing now exquisite.


About the Print: 

The artwork is printed on a luxurious and authentic archival Somerset Velvet 100% cotton rag paper. With a weight of 255g/m² the photo rag is a robust paper and has a matte surface. With its soft, fine texture, this paper displays the colors of the art beautifully. The piece is printed with premium Epson pigments  ensuring that even the minutest details are visible, and the colors appear freshly printed – even after 100 years.

 

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Haeckel Mandala

haeckel-mandala-paula-brett

Ernst Heinrich Philipp August Haeckel (German: [ˈhɛkəl]; 16 February 1834 – 9 August 1919[1]) was a German biologist, naturalist, philosopher, physician, professor, and artist who discovered, described and named thousands of new species, mapped a genealogical tree relating all life forms, and coined many terms in biology, including anthropogeny, ecology, phylum, phylogeny, stem cell, and Protista. Haeckel promoted and popularised Charles Darwin’s work in Germany and developed the influential but no longer widely held recapitulation theory (“ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny”) claiming that an individual organism’s biological development, or ontogeny, parallels and summarises its species’ evolutionary development, or phylogeny. (Wikipedia)

The images I chose to use from Haeckel’s work are all rights free and in the public domain.

About the Mandala Series:

“Mandala is a Sanskrit word:  manda= essence, la=within; it is a circle that contains the essence. The mandala symbolizes the laws of the universe and, since man is a microcosm of the universe, many cultures believe that the mandala also symbolizes the human soul.”

I’ve been drawn to Mandalas ever since I witnessed a group of Tibetan Buddhist Monks making a traditional sand mandala on the ground. The idea of creating such a beautiful work of art and then destroying it in order to symbolize the transitory nature of life intrigued me. Because of that formative experience, I’ve made mandalas intermittently over the years in different forms. Only recently have I delved into the mandalas fully as a way to meld my love for design, spirituality, and the need to create some sort of order and meaning out of so much chaos in the world. In this most recent series of mandala photographs, my intention is to arrange ordinary objects in a pattern that becomes sacred, where the everyday turns divine, the enticing now exquisite.


About the Print: 

The artwork is printed on a luxurious and authentic archival Somerset Velvet 100% cotton rag paper. With a weight of 255g/m² the photo rag is a robust paper and has a matte surface. With its soft, fine texture, this paper displays the colors of the art beautifully. The piece is printed with premium Epson pigments  ensuring that even the minutest details are visible, and the colors appear freshly printed – even after 100 years.

 

 

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Print Size

10×10", 15"x15', 20×20", 30×30", 40×40"

Paper

The artwork is printed on a luxurious and authentic archival Somerset Velvet 100% cotton rag paper. With a weight of 255g/m² the photo rag is a robust paper and has a matte surface. With its soft, fine texture, this paper displays the colors of the art beautifully. The piece is printed with premium Epson pigments ensuring that even the minutest details are visible, and the colors appear freshly printed – even after 100 years.

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